Prosthesis, the world’s first, purpose-built, off-road racing mech

Prosthesis, a giant 9,000-pound mech suit that you can pilot.
Prosthesis, a giant 9,000-pound mech suit that you can pilot. Credit: Furrion Exo-Bionics

Fourteen years ago, a bold, giantly dreamy team, Furrion Exo-Bionics, decided to build the world’s largest exoskeleton. The idea eventually becomes the world’s largest four-legged man-led mech suit. The firm Furrion Exo-Bionics, wants you to pilot it in a global race of giant exoskeletons, so they are now preparing to pioneer an entirely new sport of mech racing.

Created by Jonathan Tippett, the Prosthesis robot weighs just over 4 tons, is 4 meters high and 5 meters wide. The so-called mech-robots that are meant to be used in racing do not themselves have any intelligence but are completely controlled by a single person “sitting” inside the robots exclusively with his limbs.

The pilot will have to move his arms and his legs, and each of his movements will be transmitted then amplified by the four giant legs. Good physical health will, therefore, be absolutely essential to control the robot.

Powered by a lithium-ion battery, this robotic monster can reach the maximum speed of 30 km/h. Its chromoly steel frame – a particularly resistant alloy, used in particular for the manufacture of mountain bikes – and its four sturdy legs allow it to handle all kinds of terrain while ensuring great stability. Its power allows it, for example, to lift a truck or lift a car.

The company aspires to start a relevant championship very soon, the X1-Mech Racing League, which will pit world-class athletes against each other and test their ability to control the machine through complex obstacle courses. But piloting the Prosthesis will not be within reach of the first comer!

After thirteen years of development, Cassie Hawrysh, a Canadian skeleton champion, was the very first professional pilot to have the honor of testing the prototype designed by Tippett and his collaborators; she managed to control the machine after three days of intense training.

Supported by several industrial sponsors, the company has also launched a call on the Kickstarter platform to offer motorsport enthusiasts to contribute to the project. Depending on the level of commitment of contributors, they can benefit from individual training as a mechanical pilot, or watch the action unfold in person at live events.