Toyota showed an improved version of the humanoid robot T-HR3

Toyota continues to develop the humanoid robot T-HR3, introduced two years ago. Its improved version was on display at the 2019 International Robotics Exhibition in Tokyo and then at CES this year in Las Vegas.

T-HR3 is continuously being improved to mediate the public’s contact with athletes during the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo. It looks like the 2020 Olympic Games will be the most innovative and technically advanced games in history. T-HR3 will also be among the robots participating in this event.

It is now able to execute more difficult tasks than before.
It is now able to execute more difficult tasks than before.

T-HR3 is based on Nvidia’s Isaac software development kit for robots that serve as the brains behind the robot. According to Toyota, the T-HR3 robots will transfer images and sound between different locations; Besides that, the fans will also be able to experience movement and touch with the help of robots, so they can talk to athletes or give them a hand as if they were right next to their idols.

As before, the robot is designed for remote operator control and provides feedback, but now it can perform more complex tasks, and its movements have become more natural. In particular, an improved version of the robot can move your fingers faster and smoother because the control device has become easier and easier to use.

One of the examples of the future use of such a robot manufacturer calls surgical operations at a distance. Allegedly, the problem so far is to provide reliable and fast connections necessary for the accurate transmission of signals between a person and a robot.

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