Dyson files a patent for headphones with a built-in air purifier

Dyson specializes in home cleaning and ventilation equipment, such as vacuum cleaners, air purifiers, etc. But now it seems that it doesn’t want to be just the “vacuum cleaner company.” Back in May 2019, the company shared its idea of producing an electric vehicle.

And now, it has decided to enter the electronics field as it recently filed a patent, which describes a product that merges an air purification system with a set of headphones.

In the patent, titled “A wearable air purifier,” Dyson describes a pair of headphones with air filters built into its speakers. The patent application claims that the purpose of installing the air purifier inside the headphones is to combat the effects of air pollution in cities.

According to the patent filed by Dyson, each earcup has a motor connected to a fan-like propeller measuring 35-40 mm that will operate at 12,000 revolutions per second (rpm) and insert about 1.4 liters of air per second into the headset. The same air will be passed through the filter that is installed in the headphones, which should prevent the entry of particles such as dust and bacteria – probably.

This filtered air will then travels down a nozzle and to a front strip, which has an outlet that releases air toward your nose and mouth, providing you with fresh air to breathe.

Wearing a face mask can help prevent you from breathing in those germs and pollutants, but is not that effective. Dyson’s wearable air purifier could be an effective solution to stay healthy in germs. Also, it is already common to see people in Asian countries wearing surgical masks, so a pair of headphones with air purification is not completely outrageous.

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